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10 Worst Mascots

1

Totes McGoats (The City of Niagara Falls)

The city of Niagara Falls, New York wanted to get people—particularly millennials—more excited about recycling, so it came up with what it hoped would be a memorable mascot: Totes McGoats, a man in a latex goat mask and a blue T-shirt.

Why did the city choose a goat man? They didn’t have a lot of money to work with (the budget for the project was just $100, and $60 alone was spent on the mask), and given that goats eat everything, and Goat Island is in the middle of the Niagara Falls, a goat was a shoe-in. Furthermore, if you don’t recycle, Totes McGoats will murder you in your sleep. (Source)

2

Flamy (Fundaçao Hospitalar)

Flamy (Fundaçao Hospitalar)

Flamy is the mascot at the Fundaçao Hospitalar in Minas Gerais, Brazil, which currently receives over 100 burn victims a day. A few hospitals in the area are using Flamy to teach children about what to do with flammable materials and how to treat burns if they receive them.

I would think, as a child burn victim, you wouldn’t want to see the walking embodiment of the one thing that caused you the most pain imaginable and almost took your life, but hey, maybe that’s just me. (Source)

3

Abby the Abused Chicken (Mercy for Animals)

Abby the Abused Chicken (Mercy for Animals)

Meet “Abby the Abused Chicken,” the mascot of Mercy for Animals, an advocacy group concerned with farmed animals. Abby has apparently been raised from the dead after being boiled, busted, partially defeathered, and had her throat slit. While we get why she exists, and why she’s necessary to get the point across, it doesn’t make her any less frightening. (And, in case you were wondering, that is Moby next to her.) (Source)

4

Chuck the Condor (Los Angeles Clippers)

Chuck the Condor (Los Angeles Clippers)

In February 2016, the LA Clippers officially introduced Chuck the Condor—a cape-wearing, basketball-stuffing bird—to the world. And let’s just say the world wasn’t ready.

The public outcry was loud and swift on Twitter, and the media didn’t hold back either. A Los Angeles Times headline read, “The Clippers’ championship drive just got hijacked by a stupid bird,” while the New York Daily News lamented: “Chuck is a schmuck.”

David Raymond, who originated the famous Phillie Phanatic mascot at Philadelphia Phillies games in 1978 and helped the Clippers select and train the performer who plays Chuck, remains unfazed, saying, “This isn’t for the die-hard NBA basketball fan where there’s nothing other than what’s happening on the court. It’s about developing new fans. The Clippers want to develop young NBA fans.”

And, in truth, sponsorships. Chuck is part of a new revenue stream coming from appearances, merchandise and sponsorships. For example, he already has a shoe deal with Converse and wears Chuck Taylor All Star sneakers. (Source 1 | Source 2)

5

Kingsley (Partick Thistle)

Kingsley (Partick Thistle)

In July 2015, Partick Thistle, a football club from Glasgow, Scotland, unleashed their horrifying new mascot on an unsuspecting public.

With a jovial opening message of “HIYA PALS!” via Twitter, “Kingsley” replaced the beloved former Thistle mascot Jaggy MacBee (real name) as the crowd fronting symbol of the club. The mascot was designed by artist David Shrigley and inspired by new commercial sponsor Kingsford Capital Management, which explains the name Kingsley (and the sun, which is also in their logo), but not why he looks like Lisa Simpson if she had been tortured then melted.
(Source)

6

King Cake Baby (New Orleans Pelicans)

King Cake Baby (New Orleans Pelicans)

If you are in New Orleans and love being terrified, you can follow the New Orleans Pelicans’ Twitter account to check for the latest opportunities to stare into unflinching, dead eyes of the King Cake Baby.

A king cake is a pastry made for Mardi Gras that has a plastic baby figurine baked into the dough, and whoever gets the slice with the baby in it is said to have good luck for a year. However, we don’t know if seeing this King Cake Baby up close and personal affords you the same juju. (Source)

7

Pique (Mexico, 1986 World Cup Hosts)

Pique (Mexico, 1986 World Cup Hosts)

In 1986, Mexico, the host country for the World Cup, was given the task of creating a mascot for the biggest sporting event in the world. They then put together every single stereotype of Mexico and shoved it into character form. Pique, a Picante Pepper, grew out his mustache, put on his sombrero and cheered with the best of ’em. (Source | Photo)

8

Puppy Monkey Baby (Mountain Dew)

Puppy Monkey Baby (Mountain Dew)

Just for the record, the Puppy Monkey Baby completely freaks us out.

This creepy mascot started trending worldwide shortly after his commercial debut during Super Bowl 50 in February 2016. Apparently, Mountain Dew chose to combine three things fans enjoy in most Super Bowl commercials: a puppy, a monkey, and a baby and came up with this Island of Doctor Moreau-style abomination.
(Source | Photo)

9

The Stanford Tree (Stanford University)

The Stanford Tree (Stanford University)

For the record, Stanford University (established in 1891) does not have an official mascot. The student body has just adopted the “tree” as their unofficial mascot. It doesn’t even have a real, official costume, which is why there are different variations of the tree and why it looks so awkward and thrown together.

Despite these DIY aspects, the hurdles one has to go through to be selected as the next Tree are pretty challenging. A “Tree Week” is held every February to determine who the next Tree will be. The stunts performed by students have just three rules—don’t go to jail, don’t go to the hospital and don’t light yourself on fire. After that, anything goes. Judging the festivities are the current Tree, past Trees, and the Stanford Band. (Source 1 | Source 2)

10

Wenlock and Mandeville (London Olympics 2012)

Wenlock and Mandeville (London Olympics 2012)

Wenlock and Mandeville, the London 2012 Olympic mascots, have been described as “sinister,” “terrifying,” and like “a drunken one-night stand between a Teletubby and a Dalek.”

According to their bio, they are droplets of steel left over from the building of the Olympic stadium, said to symbolize the U.K.’s Industrial Revolution. In reality, the pair were designed by London ad agency Iris, and their creation seems calculated to offend no one, and appeal to no one as well. (Source | Photo)

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